Dating violence statistics by state

13 Mar

Researchers at Deakin University investigating Alcohol/Drug-Involved Family Violence in Australia surveyed a representative sample of 5,118 Australians and found that males accounted for between 11% and 37% of victims in incidents attended by police, 24% of intimate partner violence victims and 34% of family violence victims in the panel survey.

It also found that "there were no significant differences in the proportion of male and female respondents classified as engaging in no, low, and high Coercive Controlling Behaviours (ps showed that males made up between 20% (one in five) and 32% (one in three) reported victims of family and domestic violence-related assault, depending on the state or territory surveyed.

A perpetrator can have any relationship to a victim, and that includes the role of an intimate partner.

There are many different terms to refer to sexual assault committed by a person in a relationship with the victim, including: intimate partner sexual violence, domestic violence, intimate partner rape, marital rape, and spousal rape.

No matter what term is used or how the relationship is defined, it is never okay to engage in sexual activity without someone’s consent.

Sexual assault in a relationship rarely exists in a vacuum.

It often occurs alongside other forms of abusive behavior.

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This policy and procedure applies systemwide, in conjunction with Executive Order 1095 Revised June 23, 2015 (and any superseding related executive orders).

You may be concerned for your safety or the safety of your children, still have strong feelings for your partner, or aren’t convinced that what’s happening to you is really sexual assault. Ending an abusive relationship is not something that you have to do alone.

Reaching out for help from friends, loved ones, local organizations or law enforcement can help you through this process.

The Horrific Reality- Good Housekeeping.com" data-pin-url=" data-pin-media=" data-img320=" data-img320-w = "480" data-img320-h = "240" data-cut=320 data-zoom=" src="//ghk.h-cdn.co/assets/goodhousekeeping/20170524173116/images/blank.png" data-src=" alt="domestic violence statistics 9 seconds" data-img480=" data-img480-w = "640" data-img480-h = "320" data-img640=" data-img640-w = "768" data-img640-h = "384" data-img768=" data-img768-w = "980" data-img768-h = "490" data-img980=" data-img980-w = "768" data-img980-h = "384" data-img1024=" data-img1024-w = "980" data-img1024-h = "490" nopin="nopin" /"Domestic violence is an epidemic, no matter what statistic you look at, yet as a society we often close our eyes to it," Amy Sanchez, director of Break The Cycle, an organization on the NO MORE steering committee, tells Good "If we had a health issue that we knew was affecting millions of people, we'd work together to figure it out, like with what's been done to address smoking and heart disease.

But because this is a 'private' issue, a 'family matter,' people don't talk about it." In an effort to topple that taboo, Good pulled together a slew of surprising statistics on the subject — and the data is eye-opening.