Dating a banker blog

19 Mar

If you think bankers have got it tough on Wall Street as the economy crashes around them then spare a thought for their poor little rich girl WAGs.Supporting their greedy husbands in boom time came easy with a platinum credit card and a house in the Hamptons but the privileged princesses have found the pressures of tightening the purse strings, and the strains it puts on their relationship, so hard they've set up Dating a Banker Anonymous.Clinginess, cooking at home, canceled credit cards...these are just a few of the unfortunate consequences, these women report.The Wall Street Prep Quicklesson Series 7 Free Financial Modeling Lessons Get instant access to video lessons taught by experienced investment bankers.Learn financial statement modeling, DCF, M&A, LBO, Comps and Excel shortcuts.Pride: What kind of rich, successful guy only has 1 wife?Come on, even in third world countries polygamy is common place, so why can’t you get yourself another wife or 3?

Even the Times story’s headline — “It’s the Economy, Girlfriend!The story had been an attention-grabbing squealer of a trend piece that left readers’ eyes popped with repulsion: Here were the public woes of New York babes in their 20s and 30s whose former high-earning boyfriends had once wined and dined them but now were depressed and moody.These were men, the DABA girls told the Times, who were now having problems getting it up, who could no longer take them to fancy dinners, who threatened to move out of New York, or whose frayed nerves required care and tending (ew! “It’s not what I signed up for,” beauty writer Dawn Spinner Davis sniffed to the Times about her new “private wealth manager” husband’s recent need for nurture.” — looked like it belonged on the chick lit aisle at Barnes & Noble, and the DABA site’s language of welcome — “if your monthly Bergdorf’s allowance has been halved and bottle service has all but disappeared from your life” — sounded like a pitch for a 2003 television series.How much of the DABA project was in earnest and how much was satirical or just plain made up remains cloudy, even after the Times’ note (and the NPR and Newsweek stories about the group).